Vint Cerf: Internet Evangelist and Visionary

As a computer science major and having a Masters in Computer Science as well, I have had the privilege of meeting several famous people in this discipline.  At the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill I had the honor of working with Dr. Frederick Brooks in getting my Masters, and while there met Ivan Sutherland and others.  I was on the Arpanet years ago while at UNC sending electronic messages, not yet called email, to classmates.  Those simple communications later went global with the creation of the Internet, an information superhighway.

The creators of the Internet are Robert Kahn and Vint Cerf, who wrote most of the code.  Drs. Kahn and Cerf developed the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) that controlled the transmission of data packets among networks, which soon become the means of interconnecting all networks – the Internet, a truly transformative endeavor!

On Monday, July 16, 2018, in Washington, DC, I have the privilege of hosting Dr. Cerf at one of my events for the Licensing Executives Society, of which I am the Greater Washington, DC Chapter Chair.  The event is open to the public, and registration and information can be found at https://www.lesusacanada.org/events/EventDetails.aspx?id=1089056&group=160111   Please contact me (vandyke@acm.org) if you have difficulty getting the information or have questions.

Dr. Cerf, now Google’s Internet Evangelist, will speak on the importance of design in innovation, providing his experience with the Internet as an example to potential future new paradigm producers.  I hope to see you next Monday evening for this informative talk.

Raymond Van Dyke, Greater Washington, DC Chapter Chair, LES

 

 

Copyright and the Game of Thrones

The enormous popularity of HBO’s Game of Thrones has driven many into a frenzy.  Just as the Night King appropriated Daenerys Targaryen’s dead dragon for his own uses, many viewers think that GoT episodes should be freely available for their own uses.   The extraordinary value placed on these episodes resulted in hackers cracking into various protected systems to download them and even hold HBO for ransom.  Although the GoT mania has died down with the end of the short Seventh season, the mania nonetheless continues somewhat as we enter the doldrums until 2018 and the final season.

The incredible efforts to get the episodes are in spite of the large penalties in play.  The basic damages for copyright infringement (unauthorized copying) are between $750 to $30,000 per work.  In other words, if you hack into a system and then post a file for others, the damages could be immense, e.g., for 1,000 downloads multiple the above numbers by 1,000 to get a sense of the damage scale possible.  If a judge deems the copying willful, i.e., done on purpose and not accidental, the damages can be increased to $150,000 per work.  There is also the possibility that you will have to pay the content owner’s legal fees, and the owner may be able to seize and destroy whatever copies you have, as well as enjoin or stop you from future such copying.

In addition to the civil liability, infringers, whether small-time or mass infringers, may also be committing a felony or a misdemeanor.  A felony charge must involve an infringement of the copyright owner’s reproduction or distribution rights, two of the various copyright rights.  Further, a felony conviction carries a maximum sentence of five years in prison and a maximum fine of $250,000.  Even though there has been some leniency in the past for  individual pirating, there is still a  risk that you will be made an example.  The legal fees alone  for defending such suits are large, and, as indicated, you may be paying both sets of attorneys.

In relation to the GoT copyright craziness, here is a Consumer Reports article that cites me on the penalties.  https://www.consumerreports.org/televisions/the-risk-of-watching-pirated-game-of-thrones-episodes/  I recommend reading their other articles.

If you are accused of copyright infringement, consult an attorney to assess your situation.  If you are small fry, you may not be worth the legal effort.  However, if you go after very valuable content, such as GoT, and/or indulge in massive file sharing, you are more of a target and  the liability can be staggering.  As a computer scientist, I understand the thrill of hacking.  However, as an IP attorney helping people, whether innocent or guilty, out of the problems due to their pirating activities, all I can say is that some content owners are meaner than Cersei Lannister in protecting what is theirs.

 

 

The Importance of Pi

Today is National Pi Day because the numbers of the day (3-14) match the first three digits for Pi, which is both an irrational and a transcendental number, i.e., the number is not a ratio or a root of any other numbers and the digits in Pi have no pattern (at least in the first few trillion digits).  Mathematicians have spent their lives trying to discern meaning in Pi.  Carl Sagan’s book (not the movie) Contact dealt with this theme at length where Pi contains messages from ancient beings, and where the main character Ellie gleans some preliminary meanings.

The earliest approximations of Pi by the Egyptians, Babylonians and Indians were fractions, e.g., 22/7, which is close to Pi, 3.14159265358….  The Greeks were famous in their efforts to “square the circle,” i.e., geometrically constructing a square having the same area as a given circle, and asking whether Euclid’s axioms posit the existence of such a number.  The Greeks and many others could not do it, which had profound implications to Plato regarding the usefulness of Euclid’s theorems to describe the real world.

To this day, the importance of Pi remains high since the number pervades much of Nature, and mathematicians are still calculating it.  Also, people love to recite the digits.  Piphilology is study of techniques for people to memorize the digits.  The record now is over 100,000.  As a mathematics/computer science major, I also memorized Pi – to about 20 decimals.

On a different note, today is also National Potato Chip Day, commemorating the 1853 (or so) creation of this snack.  Apparently, there are over 1,500 such “National” days for various things, in addition to national Weeks and Months. Happy Pi Day!

Raymond Van Dyke, Pi enthusiast

Beyond the Alice Event Horizon: the spaghettification of software patenting

For anyone interested in learning more about the state of affairs for software patents now two years after the Supreme Court Alice decision, I am giving a free webinar this Thursday, April 13, 2016, at 1 PM EST USA on behalf of the Licensing Executives Society.  The link to register is below.  I wish to thank my friend Sanjay Prasad for this opportunity to speak.

http://www.lesusacanada.org/events/EventDetails.aspx?id=800491&group=160372

As a patent specialist for many years, software to me represents one of the great things about American ingenuity.  Although my practice spans many technologies, the joys of handling these cases has been tempered a bit by Justices’ and legislators’ misguided efforts to thwart one of America’s fortes (and one of our chief exports).

I first wrote code many years ago in Fortran IV, and later got a Masters in Computer Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, one of the top schools for that discipline.   At UNC, I also studied under Dr. Frederick Brooks, a preeminent scholar and researcher, before heading off to law school and learning to protect inventions of all sorts. Now, over 25 years later and well over a thousand patents defended and obtained for many clients, there are stories to be told.

My talk will address how we got into this situation where innovation is being frustrated and the patent system is perversely held to blame.

This voyage is free. I hope you sign up and join me, where I will define spaghettification;)

Ray Van Dyke

vandyke@acm.org

(202)378-3903 USA