The U.S. Patent System: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

There is a lot of reason for hope in the pro-patent community over the last several months. New USPTO Director Andrei Iancu has been saying all the right things, and the USPTO has already released helpful 101 guidance in light of Berkheimer. But there is a long way to go to get back to an equilibrium point, as we have been reminded recently by the Supreme Court’s decision in Oil States, and the U.S. Chamber’s report of the U.S. falling to 12th place in terms of patent protection worldwide. Sometimes it is darkest before the dawn, and that may be where we are now. Join us for a candid conversation about the Good, the Bad and the Ugly with prominent Intellectual Property Blogger Gene Quinn. What you need to know to navigate (and survive) the shifting winds of the U.S. patent system.
The talk is this Wednesday, May 30, 2018, starting at 4:30 PM with a networking event before and afterward.  For those in the Washington, DC area I hope that you can come to this informative meeting and social event. Here is a link to the event: https://www.lesusacanada.org/events/EventDetails.aspx?id=1110304&group=160111
If you have any questions, please feel free to contact me: vandyke@acm.org 202.378.3903.

World IP Day 2017 Redux

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The celebration of World Intellectual Property Day at the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office was held on April 26, 2017, where April 26th is the official anniversary date.

After the Chief Policy Officer of the USPTO, Shira Perlmutter, started the event, there where a number of distinguished speakers, including John Sandage, World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) Deputy Director General, Patent and Technology Sector, Joseph Ferretti, Vice President and Chief Counsel, Global Trademarks at PepsiCo, Inc. and President of the International Trademark Association (INTA),  Jeanine Hayes, Chief IP Officer of Nike, Inc., and Mario Bollini, Co-founder and Chief Technology Officer, Global Research Innovation and Technology, Inc. (GRIT).  Ms. Hayes demonstrated Nike’s commitment to improving lives with innovation, this year’s WIPD theme, with the latest in Nike technology.  Mr. Bollini then demonstrated his all-terrain Freedom Chair for the disabled.

it was a hard act to follow, but follow I did with my talk on the History of Innovation, with examples of important inventors that improved lives, such as Edison (the light bulb illuminating the night ), Morse (transmission of information faster than horses), various medical innovations, such as that of Raymond Damadian of Fonar (the creator of the magnetic resonance imager) and many other fascinating technologies.

I also talked about the origins of the intellectual property laws and the reasons we have them.  For patent and copyright, our Founders enshrined these rights into the Constitution itself – with the other “rights” set forth in the attachment, The Bill of Rights.  Also, our Founders in essence democratized the U.S. patent system, permitting anyone to file for and obtain a patent.  This was a big change from the systems on the Continent.  George Washington extolled the benefits of a patent system in the First Inaugural Address.  Also, Abraham Lincoln was an avid fan of the patent system and spoke at length about its advantages – equating the importance of the patent system to the founding of the United States.

The above speakers also spoke later at the Senate Hart building, and numerous Congressmen showed up, including Representative Goodlatte of Virginia, with whom I spoke about the importance of the patent system benefiting all Americans, whether individuals, small companies or large corporations.  We both strongly agreed that this was in America’s best interest.  Under his direction, the House of Representatives that day approved by a vote of 378-48 the Register of Copyrights Selection and Accountability Act  (H.R. 1695), which would make the appointment of the Copyright Registrar a Presidential one (instead of the current Librarian of Congress) and for a term of ten years.

I should also add that Senator Coons of Delaware, a staunch supporter of the patent system, also spoke.  His strong advocacy of the patent system is quite welcome to the patent bar and all innovators relying on the patent system.

Celebrate World IP Day! April 26th

Every April 26th is World Intellectual Property Day (WIPD).  This commemorative day was created many years ago by the World IP Organization in Geneva.  As the Chair of the Washington, DC Chapter for the Licensing Executives Society (LES), I have been championing this day for many years at the Chapter.  The intellectual properties, i.e., patent, copyrights, trademarks and trade secrets, are critically important in today’s economy, and I, as an intellectual property attorney, champion my clients in the protection of their various intellectual properties.

The celebration for this year, April 26, 2017, involves the use of Innovation for Improving Lives.

The United States Patent & Trademark Office (USPTO) has graciously invited me to give a talk on this topic, technologies through history that improve lives and also the history of intellectual property.  My part of the program will begin at noon in the Madison Auditorium at the USPTO in Alexandria, Virginia.  I have today confirmed that the event is free and open to the public.

Earlier at 11 AM, however, a number of important people will be presenting, including the Chief Policy Officer of the USPTO, Shira Perlmutter, who will kick off the event. John Sandage, World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) Deputy Director General, Patent and Technology Sector, and Joseph Ferretti, Vice President and Chief Counsel, Global Trademarks at PepsiCo, Inc. and President of the International Trademark Association (INTA), will give opening remarks.

Beginning at about 11:15 a.m., two keynote speakers will address this year’s WIPD theme of Innovation: Improving Lives by showcasing technologies brought forward by their respective companies. Jeanine Hayes, Chief IP Officer of Nike, Inc., will present FlyEase technology. Mario Bollini, Co-founder and Chief Technology Officer, Global Research Innovation and Technology, Inc. (GRIT), will demonstrate the all-terrain Freedom Chair for the disabled.

For those in the area, I welcome you to attend.  As noted, the event is open to the public, but is also focused on the Examiner Corps training.  Nonetheless, the speakers and I will be entertaining to all!  Please feel free to email me at vandyke@acm.org if you have any questions.

Ray