Speech on Intellectual Property for 2018 at the Annual Meeting of the Bar Association of Montgomery, County Maryland

Tomorrow I reprise my update on IP law at the Bar Association of Montgomery County, Maryland, which is the county adjacent Washington, DC. Lots to report, The Oil States patent case has introduced even more confusion into U.S. patent law. But the appointment and confirmation of the new Director of the USPTO, Andrei Iancu, offers some rays of hope. I also address recent events in copyright, trademark and trade secret. For those in the area, I hope that you can attend.

Here is the program: http://c.ymcdn.com/sites/www.barmont.org/resource/resmgr/temporary_newsletter_files/2018_annual_meeting_web_file.pdf

I am Chair of the IP Section. If you have any questions about IP or require assistance (I have both domestic and international clientele) please contact me.

http://www.rayvandyke.com vandyke@acm.org
My website is being updated so please excuse its primitiveness;)
Ray

A Primer on Intellectual Property: The Basic Tools for You to Know

Tomorrow (February 1, 2018), I am presenting a Continuing Legal Education (CLE) program on the Basics of Intellectual property (IP) for the general attorney.  With the value of IP assets a large factor of our economy, general practice attorneys frequently face issues in this specialized field of law of patents, trademarks, copyrights, trade secrets and some other areas.  This CLE is designed to allow non-IP attorneys to know some of the basics, understand the vernacular and know something of the problem areas.

I am pleased that the Bar Association of Montgomery County (BAMC) Maryland has offered me this opportunity.  I am also a Chair of the IP Section of BAMC.

For those in the area, I hope that you can make it – whether you need CLE or not.  Here is the link: http://www.barmont.org/events/EventDetails.aspx?id=1062031&group=

Please feel free to contact me if you need additional information.

Copyright and the Game of Thrones

The enormous popularity of HBO’s Game of Thrones has driven many into a frenzy.  Just as the Night King appropriated Daenerys Targaryen’s dead dragon for his own uses, many viewers think that GoT episodes should be freely available for their own uses.   The extraordinary value placed on these episodes resulted in hackers cracking into various protected systems to download them and even hold HBO for ransom.  Although the GoT mania has died down with the end of the short Seventh season, the mania nonetheless continues somewhat as we enter the doldrums until 2018 and the final season.

The incredible efforts to get the episodes are in spite of the large penalties in play.  The basic damages for copyright infringement (unauthorized copying) are between $750 to $30,000 per work.  In other words, if you hack into a system and then post a file for others, the damages could be immense, e.g., for 1,000 downloads multiple the above numbers by 1,000 to get a sense of the damage scale possible.  If a judge deems the copying willful, i.e., done on purpose and not accidental, the damages can be increased to $150,000 per work.  There is also the possibility that you will have to pay the content owner’s legal fees, and the owner may be able to seize and destroy whatever copies you have, as well as enjoin or stop you from future such copying.

In addition to the civil liability, infringers, whether small-time or mass infringers, may also be committing a felony or a misdemeanor.  A felony charge must involve an infringement of the copyright owner’s reproduction or distribution rights, two of the various copyright rights.  Further, a felony conviction carries a maximum sentence of five years in prison and a maximum fine of $250,000.  Even though there has been some leniency in the past for  individual pirating, there is still a  risk that you will be made an example.  The legal fees alone  for defending such suits are large, and, as indicated, you may be paying both sets of attorneys.

In relation to the GoT copyright craziness, here is a Consumer Reports article that cites me on the penalties.  https://www.consumerreports.org/televisions/the-risk-of-watching-pirated-game-of-thrones-episodes/  I recommend reading their other articles.

If you are accused of copyright infringement, consult an attorney to assess your situation.  If you are small fry, you may not be worth the legal effort.  However, if you go after very valuable content, such as GoT, and/or indulge in massive file sharing, you are more of a target and  the liability can be staggering.  As a computer scientist, I understand the thrill of hacking.  However, as an IP attorney helping people, whether innocent or guilty, out of the problems due to their pirating activities, all I can say is that some content owners are meaner than Cersei Lannister in protecting what is theirs.

 

 

Roberts Rules of Order

The Supreme Court has been quite active fine-tuning the patent system and deboning the law of the Federal Circuits for many years.  Today is no exception.

In Impression Products, Inc. v. Lexmark International, Inc.  (May 30, 2017), Chief Justice Roberts took to task the Federal Circuit’s take on the law of patent exhaustion, i.e., whether a patentee upon a sale retains any rights to the sold object.  In this case, Lexmark tried to prevent other companies, such as Impression, from refilling Lexmark printer ink toner cartridges.  Obviously, the printer ink business is quite lucrative and it is no surprise that this case made it to the Supreme Court.

The Federal Circuit had earlier held that Lexmark’s proscriptions on refilling were acceptable, whether the sales were within the United States or abroad (for import).  The nuanced, decades-old jurisprudence of the Federal Circuit held patent law in special regard vis-à-vis other areas of law, and permitted limited controls post-sale.

Back in 2013, the same issue arose in a copyright dispute.  The Court there held that the first sale doctrine extinguished a copyright holder’s rights.  In that case, Kirtsaeng v. John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Kirtsaeng sold Wiley textbooks printed in Thailand on eBay for U.S. students.  The large price differential between the prices in the United States and Thailand made the venture profitable, much to the chagrin of Wiley who sued him.

Just as in Kirtsaeng, the Court today said restrictions or conditions on resale or use constituted unlawful restraints on alienation.   Thus, Lexmark cannot predicate their refilling policy on patent law.  They can, of course, seek coverage under licensing, contract law or another approach.  To Chief Justice Roberts, the patentee upon selling the object has obtained the full measure of the patent right, i.e., no rights remain and the patent right is exhausted.

Justice Ginsburg, who dissented in Kirtsaeng, dissented here.  In her dissent, she made several cogent points.  First, the patent system is different from the copyright system, which has an explicit first-sale statutory provision – unlike patent.  Second, the territorial nature of the patent system and activities in global commerce suggest different handling.  Foreign activities have no bearing on the existence of U.S. patent rights.  Also, the patent laws differ between countries, unlike the more uniform copyright laws, making the first sale exhaustion argument for patent weaker.

Nonetheless, Lexmark and other patentees will now have to take care to obtain a fair price for their products at the time of sale.  Roberts Rules of Order for IP are straightforward: the patent bargain must honed further, and the rogue interpretations of the Federal Circuit must be stamped out.  It is rather odd that the Court regularly condemns the Federal Circuit, yet often has zero alternative interpretation.  The Alice and other recent cases simply held that they did not like the interpretation of the Federal Circuit, and no substitute was proffered.  Here, however, we have a clear directive: you sell a patented item and that is all you get for it.

Celebrate World IP Day! April 26th

Every April 26th is World Intellectual Property Day (WIPD).  This commemorative day was created many years ago by the World IP Organization in Geneva.  As the Chair of the Washington, DC Chapter for the Licensing Executives Society (LES), I have been championing this day for many years at the Chapter.  The intellectual properties, i.e., patent, copyrights, trademarks and trade secrets, are critically important in today’s economy, and I, as an intellectual property attorney, champion my clients in the protection of their various intellectual properties.

The celebration for this year, April 26, 2017, involves the use of Innovation for Improving Lives.

The United States Patent & Trademark Office (USPTO) has graciously invited me to give a talk on this topic, technologies through history that improve lives and also the history of intellectual property.  My part of the program will begin at noon in the Madison Auditorium at the USPTO in Alexandria, Virginia.  I have today confirmed that the event is free and open to the public.

Earlier at 11 AM, however, a number of important people will be presenting, including the Chief Policy Officer of the USPTO, Shira Perlmutter, who will kick off the event. John Sandage, World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) Deputy Director General, Patent and Technology Sector, and Joseph Ferretti, Vice President and Chief Counsel, Global Trademarks at PepsiCo, Inc. and President of the International Trademark Association (INTA), will give opening remarks.

Beginning at about 11:15 a.m., two keynote speakers will address this year’s WIPD theme of Innovation: Improving Lives by showcasing technologies brought forward by their respective companies. Jeanine Hayes, Chief IP Officer of Nike, Inc., will present FlyEase technology. Mario Bollini, Co-founder and Chief Technology Officer, Global Research Innovation and Technology, Inc. (GRIT), will demonstrate the all-terrain Freedom Chair for the disabled.

For those in the area, I welcome you to attend.  As noted, the event is open to the public, but is also focused on the Examiner Corps training.  Nonetheless, the speakers and I will be entertaining to all!  Please feel free to email me at vandyke@acm.org if you have any questions.

Ray

Copyrights for the Creative Community

For those in the Washington, DC area, I am speaking on the basics of Copyright for authors, videographers, and other artists for the Montgomery County Media group at  Montgomery County Television in Rockville, MD tomorrow, September 13, 2016 starting at 6:30 PM.  The address and to MCM are below:

Montgomery Community Television, Inc.
7548 Standish Place
Rockville, MD 20855

My wife and I have had the privilege of learning studio techniques, producing video, and other studio skills at MCM.  I hope that you can make this talk.

Ray Van Dyke Presentation to the Montgomery County Media organization description:

This lively presentation will cover the basics of copyright law and current issues showing the ongoing transformation of copyright.  Since creativity and copyright go hand-in-hand, this presentation will be both relevant and informative.

Ray Van Dyke is an intellectual property (IP) practitioner in Montgomery County and DC, handling patent, trademark, copyright and other legal matters for his clientele.  He is Co-Chair of the IP Section of the Montgomery County Bar Association, and active in many other IP and technical societies.  He also teaches IP law issues at several institutions, particularly Southern Methodist University, where he is an Adjunct Professor.

Please send me an email to let me know you are coming to the event.  vandyke@acm.org

Ray

The weblink to MCM: http://www.mymcmedia.org/